Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Resolution

I've been quite delinquent in writing a follow up post to my previous post about our water woes, and it is my understanding that I have left some of our readers hanging. Well, fear not, readers. You'll be happy to know that we've had fresh, clean water available on the boat since my last post; however, it took us a bit of time to fully identify and fix the problem.

So here it is...the exciting conclusion to the mystery of our foamy water.

In my last post, I explained that we had run into a strange problem with our fresh tap water. It had, for all intents and purposes, become carbonated.

Thankfully, our water tank, which holds 267 gallons of water, was full of pre-foam water, so at the first sign of trouble, we disconnected from the city line and switched the boat over to our water tank.

Then our investigation began...

Since we had ruled out a decaying hose as the source of the problem, we figured there was an issue with the connection between the hose and our boat, and we believed our recently installed "quick release valve" was the culprit. I'm not going to get into the details of why we thought this or what a quick release valve is, since discussing a water hose and its accompanied accessories is probably the most boring topic ever, but suffice it to say, we have a hose, a valve, and a boat, and we believed that air was getting into the pressurized water through a gap in the hose-valve-boat connection, thus carbonating it.

After tinkering with our quick release valve (we tightened it), the problem appeared to be solved, but a few days later, the foam returned. We assumed the valve had become lose, so we (Eric) tightened it again. Everything appeared to be OK. Then, the foam returned. And so on and so on. We repeated this song and dance about 10 times. And what a fun dance it was. I'm not sure what exactly tightening the valve involved, but each time Eric returned from doing so, he was soaking wet, as though he had taken an impromptu, fully clothed shower mid valve-tightening. Needless to say, this wasn't a sustainable situation.

So, regardless of whether or not the valve was causing the problem, the fact that you couldn't tighten it and hope to remain dry prompted us to replace the valve with something a bit more user-friendly. Now, to connect/disconnect from the city line, we only need to move a lever:

Connected to the City Line
Disconnected from the City Line
We also got a new hose, as the one we were using appeared to be in the early stages of decay.

For good measure, we also got a 3rd, land-based filtration system, which filters the water from the city before it enters the hose (and our water tank). Hopefully this will help the hose last longer and should keep our water cleaner (and better tasting) as well.

So, the problem has been solved...for the time being anyway. And, while I have no doubt foam will once again flow freely from our tap, when it returns, we'll know how to fix it...or at least we'll know how to bandage the problem for 3-6 months.

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